The Yeager Estate – Historic Mansion in the Catskill Mountains of New York

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Hi everybody,

The abandoned mansion we’ll show you today is from New York.

Built by Yeager Benjamin in 1936, the Yeager Estate featured unique Spanish Revival styling paired with blonde brick with Art Deco patterns and a Mediterranean tile roof. A full balustraded porch, terraces, and stained glass windows complemented the exterior.

Inside were 32 rooms spread between two floors and a full attic and basement with four kitchens and six baths. It featured ornate plaster in the living rooms, dining room and ballrooms, a wrought iron and oak banister and frescoes in the front hall, four mantels in the dining room, living room and ballroom. A sitting room on the second floor featured a fountain with a decorative frog.

Decline

In May 1969, the mansion was acquired by the Ahavath Israel Congregation. It was then resold to Vincent Oliver in December 1970 for use as the Respite Villa, a semi-independent home for mentally deficient adults. It offered short and long-term residency, vocational training, self-help skills, structured leisure time activities, and care. It was considered a pioneer residence program for the mentally ill at the time, covering New York, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Vermont, and New Jersey.

The Yeager Estate was listed as abandoned by 1978.

The village the mansion resides in was a commercial and social center for an agricultural community. Hunters, anglers and other outdoor enthusiasts, contempt to camp or board in farmhouses or primitive inns, had begun to arrive in the region by the 1830s. When the railroad arrived in town in 1873, the village tourist industry flourished and numerous summer residences for the New York City wealthy were constructed.

By the 1920s, Sullivan County was firmly established as a Jewish resort area and the town began to display upscale sophistication with the construction of numerous mansions and summer cottages. The last vestiges of the agrarian origins of the town faded, with downtown prospering with new intense commercial buildings, theatres, and fueling stations.

The Jewish resorts became part of the “Borscht Belt,” an area once distinguished by scores of Jewish summer resort hotels, cabin colonies, and camps. Tourism in Liberty peaked after World War II, when massive resort facilities, such as Grossinger’s and The Pines, were built in the countryside.

By the 1960s, tourism in Liberty had entered a decline and the town reverted to being a local commercial center. Some obsolete hotels, such as the Liberty House, were destroyed in fires and not rebuilt. Others, like the Mansion House, were razed for municipal parking or commercial buildings.

Vacationers stopped visiting Liberty and the “Borscht Belt” by the 1970s. Air travel was becoming increasingly convenient and cheap and the advent of interstate highways made long-distance automobile travel easier.

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An 11-room Abandoned Brick House Built in Scott County, Kentucky, circa 1792.

Hi everybody,

The abandoned house we’ll show you today is from Scott County, Kentucky.

The James K. Duke House is an antebellum, 11-room brick house constructed circa 1792 in Scott County, Kentucky.

History

The land the residence was built upon was deeded to Col. Abram Buford who fought in the French and Indian War and the American Revolution on behalf of the United States. For his service to the nation, Buford was granted thousands of acres of fertile land in Virginia (later Kentucky). He moved his family to the western fringes of the commonwealth where they settled and built a residence.

Buford was instrumental in the development of the horse industry in the state. Upon relocation, Buford acquired thoroughbred sires and raised horses. With assistance from his brother, Simeon, two horses owned by Buford were named the first course winners in the Kentucky Gazette in November 1795. Buford was also instrumental in forming the first Jockey Club in Lexington.

Buford’s daughter, Mary, married James K. Duke, a Washington, Kentucky resident and a graduate of Yale Law School, on February 5, 1822. After Buford died in 1833, they inherited the residence which was enlarged and rebuilt to orient to the south. The family was known for their lavish entertainment on the farm and for their famed horse stables.

The woodland pasture in front of the house was a noted dueling ground. 1 The first recorded was the duel between Dr. Dudley and Dr. Richardson in August 1818, followed by Trotter and Wickliffe in March 1829, Smith and Holt in 1848 and Desha and Kimbrough in 1866, which was one of the last duels in the state.

Duke was reported as being distressed by the Civil War and opposed secession, and worked towards reconciliation. Duke passed away on the farm on August 2, 1863.

His nephew, General Basil W. Duke, graduated in law from Transylvania University in Lexington in 1847. Basil was born in 1837 and came to live with his uncle, James Duke, after the divorce of his parents. In 1861, Basil married Henrietta Morgan, sister of John Hunt Morgan.

When Morgan’s Second Kentucky Cavalry was formed, Duke became a lieutenant who rode on all of Morgan’s raids. After Morgan’s death, he was promoted to a brigade commander. After the war, Basil practiced law in Louisville and served as counsel for the Louisville & Nashville Railroad. He was elected to the state legislature in 1869 and later served as Commonwealth Attorney in Louisville for six years.

The residence was later part of the infamous Walnut Hill Stud Farm, part of which became the Kentucky Horse Park in 1978.

Best Abandoned explores and shares all abandoned structures and vehicles around the world for our valued readers. Do not forget to check out other interesting abandoned structures on our site!

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Historic

Photographs by Ann Bevins, taken in 1970, for the National Register of Historic Places Property Photograph Form.

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Kenoza Dell Abandoned House from New York

Hi everybody,

We are here with another abandoned house.

The Kenoza Dell House is an abandoned tourist boarding house in the Catskill Mountains of New York.

Boarding houses began to develop in the Catskills in the late 1800s as working-class families sought refuge from the dirty, unhealthy city in the mountains. Lodgers would rent one or more rooms for one or more nights, and meals were usually not included in the tab.

The earliest boarding houses were on farms that enabled rural families to supplement their farm income. In some instances, farmhouses would be enlarged, or entirely new structures would be built to accommodate guests. Like tenements in New York City, the boarding houses typically had shared bathrooms and flexible spaces, where living rooms could double as bedrooms or workrooms. Privacy was a luxury.

The advent of the automobile led to fewer stays at boarding houses as it became more feasible for tourists to conduct day trips without the need for overnight accommodations.

Additionally, by the middle of the 20th century, expectations for family privacy and guest services made taking in boarders unappealing. It also became uneconomical, as new motels began to take the place of boarding houses.

The Kenoza Dell House was operated by Joseph Welch and opened circa 1896 on a hillside overlooking the scenic East Branch Callicoon Creek. It featured “modern improvements, amusements, automobile service” with room for 70 people according to a 1914 advertisement. It closed circa 1955 as a boarding house. The first floor used as a single residence until circa 1995.

Best Abandoned explores and shares all abandoned structures and vehicles around the world for our valued readers. Do not forget to check out other interesting abandoned structures on our site!

We invite you to send your story and abandoned home photos. Thank you! You can share it using the email and social media reshare buttons below. Thank you!

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Chateau Alègre in France

A charming castle, built in 1574 classified as a historical monument, abandoned for many years, which is ransacked!

Not from the outside but from the inside, in addition to vandalism and looting, the castle has undergone modifications for a project of luxury studios and apartments abandoned since then, the building site, left in its state, has deteriorated the authenticity of this castle full of history.

A shameful carnage, where we wander through these overdue pieces that have become dovecotes, being careful not to pass through the floor.

There are still large chimneys of splendid carved bricks and stones … that’s all.

Edward Gein Castle – France

Abandoned castle lost in the middle of the vineyards near Bordeaux. A place in poor condition, almost in ruins with an uninteresting exterior. The exterior of the estate looks like a postcard with this outdoor swimming pool and the view of the surroundings.

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Abandoned ghost village in Turkey

A Turkish apparition town abandoned in a populace exchange with Greece.

The deserted ruins of this once-clamoring town are settled against the Taurus Mountains, near the world-celebrated sea shores and yacht-filled harbor at Olu Deniz. Despite the fact that the stone structures are roofless and endured and the tight boulevards worn with age, this isn’t an old city, however a cutting edge ruin abandoned for political reasons during the 1920s.

In Lycian times, the town was known as Karmilassos. At the point when the Greeks involved it, they changed its name to Levissi. The principal notice of Levissi goes back to the fourteenth century and it has a place with Sanudo, an Italian explorer.

Initially inherent the 1700s, the town called Karmylassos in Greek was home to upwards of 20,000 Greek Orthodox inhabitants by the mid twentieth century. The chaotic aftermath of World War I and the breakdown of the Ottoman Empire prompted the land snatches of the Greco-Turkish War (1919–1922). The reverberating loss of the Greeks in this war finished with savagery and retaliation, which was frequently focused on the staying Greek Orthodox people group inside the new Turkish outskirts, and thus, against the Muslim Turks in Greece. A huge number of Greeks fled the savagery in Turkey, which drove the administrations to consent to a shared obligatory populace exchange beginning in 1923 so as to firm the gore.

The occupants of Kayakoy, who had up to this point lived calmly with their Turkish neighbors, abandoned the town and went to Greece, which was battling to discover places for the about 200,000 displaced people of the exchange, added to the in excess of a million previous Turkish inhabitants who had fled before the official exchange. More than 300,000 Turks were coercively expelled from Greece to a war-desolated, yet land-rich, Turkey in exchange. The polar pilgrim and Nobel Prize-winning Norwegian researcher Fridtjof Nansen was doled out the undertaking of sorting out the exchange.

In Kayakoy, roughly 350 homes currently sit void and for the most part roofless, alongside two Greek Orthodox houses of worship and the wellsprings and reservoirs that watered the city. Cruel winters and solid breezes have stripped the structures down to ruins, making the town look antiquated. A private historical center recounts to the narrative of the town.

The book Birds Without Wings by Louis de Bernieres is set in a fictionalized form of Karakoy during WWI and the most recent days of the Ottoman Empire.

Kayaköy was embraced by the UNESCO as a World Friendship and Peace Village.

Abandoned church looking like a giant chicken in Indonesia

Somewhere down in the thick woods of Central Java, transcending over the encompassing trees, lies an abandoned, disintegrating church looking like a giant chicken with its snout open mid-cackle. Called Gereja Ayam (“Chicken Church”) by local people, this odd structure draws in several explorers and picture takers to the slopes of Magelang, Indonesia every year.

The story behind Gereja Ayam is nearly as peculiar as the structure itself. In the late ’80s, a man named Daniel Alamsjah claims he got a heavenly message from God instructing him to assemble a supplication house looking like a pigeon. The 67-year-old picked a slope not a long way from Magelang, his significant other’s old neighborhood, as the site of his aspiring undertaking. Along with 30 local people, Alamsjah began development on the amazing structure during the ’90s.

In spite of his Christian confidence, Alamsjah says that the supplication house was intended to invite admirers all things considered. Numerous Christians, Muslims, and Buddhists congregated under its housetop, while the lower floors were utilized as recovery offices for sedate addicts, youngsters with incapacities, upset adolescents, and the intellectually sick.

The congregation shut its entryways in 2000 on the grounds that development costs were excessively high, however it keeps on being an object of interest to numerous guests in the territory.

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