The Yeager Estate – Historic Mansion in the Catskill Mountains of New York

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Hi everybody,

The abandoned mansion we’ll show you today is from New York.

Built by Yeager Benjamin in 1936, the Yeager Estate featured unique Spanish Revival styling paired with blonde brick with Art Deco patterns and a Mediterranean tile roof. A full balustraded porch, terraces, and stained glass windows complemented the exterior.

Inside were 32 rooms spread between two floors and a full attic and basement with four kitchens and six baths. It featured ornate plaster in the living rooms, dining room and ballrooms, a wrought iron and oak banister and frescoes in the front hall, four mantels in the dining room, living room and ballroom. A sitting room on the second floor featured a fountain with a decorative frog.

Decline

In May 1969, the mansion was acquired by the Ahavath Israel Congregation. It was then resold to Vincent Oliver in December 1970 for use as the Respite Villa, a semi-independent home for mentally deficient adults. It offered short and long-term residency, vocational training, self-help skills, structured leisure time activities, and care. It was considered a pioneer residence program for the mentally ill at the time, covering New York, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Vermont, and New Jersey.

The Yeager Estate was listed as abandoned by 1978.

The village the mansion resides in was a commercial and social center for an agricultural community. Hunters, anglers and other outdoor enthusiasts, contempt to camp or board in farmhouses or primitive inns, had begun to arrive in the region by the 1830s. When the railroad arrived in town in 1873, the village tourist industry flourished and numerous summer residences for the New York City wealthy were constructed.

By the 1920s, Sullivan County was firmly established as a Jewish resort area and the town began to display upscale sophistication with the construction of numerous mansions and summer cottages. The last vestiges of the agrarian origins of the town faded, with downtown prospering with new intense commercial buildings, theatres, and fueling stations.

The Jewish resorts became part of the “Borscht Belt,” an area once distinguished by scores of Jewish summer resort hotels, cabin colonies, and camps. Tourism in Liberty peaked after World War II, when massive resort facilities, such as Grossinger’s and The Pines, were built in the countryside.

By the 1960s, tourism in Liberty had entered a decline and the town reverted to being a local commercial center. Some obsolete hotels, such as the Liberty House, were destroyed in fires and not rebuilt. Others, like the Mansion House, were razed for municipal parking or commercial buildings.

Vacationers stopped visiting Liberty and the “Borscht Belt” by the 1970s. Air travel was becoming increasingly convenient and cheap and the advent of interstate highways made long-distance automobile travel easier.

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Kenoza Dell Abandoned House from New York

Hi everybody,

We are here with another abandoned house.

The Kenoza Dell House is an abandoned tourist boarding house in the Catskill Mountains of New York.

Boarding houses began to develop in the Catskills in the late 1800s as working-class families sought refuge from the dirty, unhealthy city in the mountains. Lodgers would rent one or more rooms for one or more nights, and meals were usually not included in the tab.

The earliest boarding houses were on farms that enabled rural families to supplement their farm income. In some instances, farmhouses would be enlarged, or entirely new structures would be built to accommodate guests. Like tenements in New York City, the boarding houses typically had shared bathrooms and flexible spaces, where living rooms could double as bedrooms or workrooms. Privacy was a luxury.

The advent of the automobile led to fewer stays at boarding houses as it became more feasible for tourists to conduct day trips without the need for overnight accommodations.

Additionally, by the middle of the 20th century, expectations for family privacy and guest services made taking in boarders unappealing. It also became uneconomical, as new motels began to take the place of boarding houses.

The Kenoza Dell House was operated by Joseph Welch and opened circa 1896 on a hillside overlooking the scenic East Branch Callicoon Creek. It featured “modern improvements, amusements, automobile service” with room for 70 people according to a 1914 advertisement. It closed circa 1955 as a boarding house. The first floor used as a single residence until circa 1995.

Best Abandoned explores and shares all abandoned structures and vehicles around the world for our valued readers. Do not forget to check out other interesting abandoned structures on our site!

We invite you to send your story and abandoned home photos. Thank you! You can share it using the email and social media reshare buttons below. Thank you!

Photo Source : Abandonedonline
Photo Source : Abandonedonline
Photo Source : Abandonedonline
Photo Source : Abandonedonline
Photo Source : Abandonedonline
Photo Source : Abandonedonline