An 11-room Abandoned Brick House Built in Scott County, Kentucky, circa 1792.

Hi everybody,

The abandoned house we’ll show you today is from Scott County, Kentucky.

The James K. Duke House is an antebellum, 11-room brick house constructed circa 1792 in Scott County, Kentucky.

History

The land the residence was built upon was deeded to Col. Abram Buford who fought in the French and Indian War and the American Revolution on behalf of the United States. For his service to the nation, Buford was granted thousands of acres of fertile land in Virginia (later Kentucky). He moved his family to the western fringes of the commonwealth where they settled and built a residence.

Buford was instrumental in the development of the horse industry in the state. Upon relocation, Buford acquired thoroughbred sires and raised horses. With assistance from his brother, Simeon, two horses owned by Buford were named the first course winners in the Kentucky Gazette in November 1795. Buford was also instrumental in forming the first Jockey Club in Lexington.

Buford’s daughter, Mary, married James K. Duke, a Washington, Kentucky resident and a graduate of Yale Law School, on February 5, 1822. After Buford died in 1833, they inherited the residence which was enlarged and rebuilt to orient to the south. The family was known for their lavish entertainment on the farm and for their famed horse stables.

The woodland pasture in front of the house was a noted dueling ground. 1 The first recorded was the duel between Dr. Dudley and Dr. Richardson in August 1818, followed by Trotter and Wickliffe in March 1829, Smith and Holt in 1848 and Desha and Kimbrough in 1866, which was one of the last duels in the state.

Duke was reported as being distressed by the Civil War and opposed secession, and worked towards reconciliation. Duke passed away on the farm on August 2, 1863.

His nephew, General Basil W. Duke, graduated in law from Transylvania University in Lexington in 1847. Basil was born in 1837 and came to live with his uncle, James Duke, after the divorce of his parents. In 1861, Basil married Henrietta Morgan, sister of John Hunt Morgan.

When Morgan’s Second Kentucky Cavalry was formed, Duke became a lieutenant who rode on all of Morgan’s raids. After Morgan’s death, he was promoted to a brigade commander. After the war, Basil practiced law in Louisville and served as counsel for the Louisville & Nashville Railroad. He was elected to the state legislature in 1869 and later served as Commonwealth Attorney in Louisville for six years.

The residence was later part of the infamous Walnut Hill Stud Farm, part of which became the Kentucky Horse Park in 1978.

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Historic

Photographs by Ann Bevins, taken in 1970, for the National Register of Historic Places Property Photograph Form.

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Kenoza Dell Abandoned House from New York

Hi everybody,

We are here with another abandoned house.

The Kenoza Dell House is an abandoned tourist boarding house in the Catskill Mountains of New York.

Boarding houses began to develop in the Catskills in the late 1800s as working-class families sought refuge from the dirty, unhealthy city in the mountains. Lodgers would rent one or more rooms for one or more nights, and meals were usually not included in the tab.

The earliest boarding houses were on farms that enabled rural families to supplement their farm income. In some instances, farmhouses would be enlarged, or entirely new structures would be built to accommodate guests. Like tenements in New York City, the boarding houses typically had shared bathrooms and flexible spaces, where living rooms could double as bedrooms or workrooms. Privacy was a luxury.

The advent of the automobile led to fewer stays at boarding houses as it became more feasible for tourists to conduct day trips without the need for overnight accommodations.

Additionally, by the middle of the 20th century, expectations for family privacy and guest services made taking in boarders unappealing. It also became uneconomical, as new motels began to take the place of boarding houses.

The Kenoza Dell House was operated by Joseph Welch and opened circa 1896 on a hillside overlooking the scenic East Branch Callicoon Creek. It featured “modern improvements, amusements, automobile service” with room for 70 people according to a 1914 advertisement. It closed circa 1955 as a boarding house. The first floor used as a single residence until circa 1995.

Best Abandoned explores and shares all abandoned structures and vehicles around the world for our valued readers. Do not forget to check out other interesting abandoned structures on our site!

We invite you to send your story and abandoned home photos. Thank you! You can share it using the email and social media reshare buttons below. Thank you!

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Chateau Alègre in France

A charming castle, built in 1574 classified as a historical monument, abandoned for many years, which is ransacked!

Not from the outside but from the inside, in addition to vandalism and looting, the castle has undergone modifications for a project of luxury studios and apartments abandoned since then, the building site, left in its state, has deteriorated the authenticity of this castle full of history.

A shameful carnage, where we wander through these overdue pieces that have become dovecotes, being careful not to pass through the floor.

There are still large chimneys of splendid carved bricks and stones … that’s all.

Edward Gein Castle – France

Abandoned castle lost in the middle of the vineyards near Bordeaux. A place in poor condition, almost in ruins with an uninteresting exterior. The exterior of the estate looks like a postcard with this outdoor swimming pool and the view of the surroundings.

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